2011-04-01 / Community

High school students learn alongside trade professionals


HANDS-ON—Students from the Architecture, Construction & Engineering Charter High School in Camarillo recently toiled side by side construction professionals to learn how to work with concrete and the tools and materials associated with the trade. The charter high school, which was opened last year, is meant to prepare students for careers in architecture, drafting, engineering or construction management. HANDS-ON—Students from the Architecture, Construction & Engineering Charter High School in Camarillo recently toiled side by side construction professionals to learn how to work with concrete and the tools and materials associated with the trade. The charter high school, which was opened last year, is meant to prepare students for careers in architecture, drafting, engineering or construction management. On March 25, ACE Charter High School had a schoolwide, hands-on demonstration of how to work with concrete using the tools and materials associated with the trade.

“It was cool having actual experts out to teach us. I learned that you have to level the concrete even when there’s a small slope,” said student Daniel Cervantes, 15.

“ I was surprised at the amount of female students volunteering to help with the activities,” said student Manuel Gomez, 15.

DMI donated concrete. Victor Gonzalas of Crest Concrete; John Martin, a handyman; and Jeff Randall, a builder from Orange County, gave of their time and tools to help facilitate the demonstrations.

Chris Bailey with Bio Diesel Concrete Pumping demonstrated his cement pump truck.

“ The collaboration between community members and the high school worked out wonderfully. We plan to repeat this success in the future with professionals from many different trades and industries,” said Daniel Bell, construction teacher at ACE.

Peter Evering from the New School of Architecture + Design gave a presentation about the school. He also spoke about green building and the reuse of existing buildings, such as an old Wonder Bread building the school uses and an unsold condominium building that now houses the students.

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